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Single line diagram

This technical article explains how to calculate and draw a single line diagram of the three-phase, 60-Hz system power system with generators, motors, transformers and lines.

Calculate and Draw a Single Line Diagram For The Power System (Generators, Motors, Transformers & Lines)
Calculate and Draw a Single Line Diagram For The Power System (Generators, Motors, Transformers & Lines) - photo credit: merko.ee

The following components comprise a simplified version of a power system, listed in sequential physical order from the generator location to the load:

  1. Two steam-electric generators, each at 13.2 kV
  2. Two step-up transformers, 13.2/66 kV
  3. Sending-end, high-voltage bus at 66 kV
  4. One long transmission line at 66 kV
  5. Receiving-end bus at 66 kV
  6. A second 66 kV transmission line with a center-tap bus
  7. Step-down transformer at receiving-end bus, 66/12 kV, supplying four 12 kV motors in parallel and
  8. A step-down transformer, 66/7.2 kV, off the center-tap bus, supplying a 7.2 kV motor

Calculation Procedure

1. Identify the Appropriate Symbols

For electric power networks an appropriate selection of graphic symbols is shown in Figure 1 (common power symbols used in single line diagrams):

Common power symbols used in single line diagrams
Figure 1 – Common power symbols used in single line diagrams


2. Draw the Required System

The system described in the problem is shown in Figure 2. The oil circuit breakers are added at the appropriate points for proper isolation of equipment.

Three-phase power system represented by single line diagram
Figure 2 – Three-phase power system represented by single line diagram

Related Calculations

It is the general procedure to use single line diagrams for representing three-phase systems. When analysis is done using symmetrical components, different diagrams may be drawn that will represent the electric circuitry for positive, negative, and zero-sequence components.

Additionally, it is often necessary to identify the grounding connection, or whether the device is wye- or delta-connected.

This type of notation is shown in Figure 3.

Identification for wye-connected generator or motor. (a) Solidly grounded. (b) Grounded through an inductance. (c) The transformer is identified as being delta-wye, with the wye side solidly grounded.
Figure 3 – Identification for wye-connected generator or motor. (a) Solidly grounded. (b) Grounded through an inductance. (c) The transformer is identified as being delta-wye, with the wye side solidly grounded.

Per-unit method of solving of 3-phase problems

For the system shown in Figure 4, draw the electric circuit or reactance diagram, with all reactances marked in per-unit (p.u.) values, and find the generator terminal voltage assuming both motors operating at 12 kV, three-quarters load, and unity power factor.

GeneratorTransformers
(each)
Motor AMotor BTransmission
Line
13.8kV25,000 kVA15,000 kVA10,000 kVA
25,000 kVA 3-phase13.2/69 kV13.0 kV13.0 kV
X” = 15 percentXL = 15 percentX” = 15 percentX” = 15 percentX = 65 Ω
Single line diagram of electric-power system supplying motor loads. Specifications are given in above table.
Figure 4 – Single line diagram of electric-power system supplying motor loads. Specifications are given in above table.

Calculation Procedure in 8 steps

1. Establish Base Voltage through the System

By observation of the magnitude of the components in the system, a base value of apparent power S is chosen. It should be of the general magnitude of the components, and the choice is arbitrary. In this problem, 25,000 kVA is chosen as the base S, and simultaneously, at the generator end 13.8 kV is selected as a base voltage Vbase.

The base voltage of the transmission line is then determined by the turns ratio of the connecting transformer:
(13.8 kV)(69 kV / 13.2 kV) = 72.136 kV

The base voltage of the motors is determined likewise but with the 72.136 kV value, thus:
(72.136 kV)(13.2 kV / 69 kV) = 13.8 kV

The selected base S value remains constant throughout the system, but the base voltage is 13.8 kV at the generator and at the motors, and 72.136 kV on the transmission line.


2. Calculate the Generator Reactance

No calculation is necessary for correcting the value of the generator reactance because it is given as 0.15 p.u. (15 percent), based on 25,000 kVA and 13.8 kV. If a different S base were used in this problem, then a correction would be necessary as shown for the transmission line, electric motors, and power transformers.


3. Calculate the Transformer Reactance

It is necessary to make a correction when the transformer nameplate reactance is used because the calculated operation is at a different voltage, 13.8 kV / 72.136 kV instead of 13.2 kV / 69 kV.

Use the equation for correction: per-unit reactance:

(nameplate per-unit reactance) (base kVA/nameplate kVA) (nameplate kV/base kV)2  =
(0.11) (25,000/25,000) (13.2/13.8)2 = 0.101 p.u.

This applies to each transformer.


4. Calculate the Transmission-Line Reactance

Use the equation:

  • Xper unit = (ohms reactance)(base kVA)/(1000)(base kV)2 =
  • Xper unit = (65) (25,000)/(1000)(72.1)2 = 0.313 p.u.

5. Calculate the Reactance of the Motors

Corrections need to be made in the nameplate ratings of both motors because of differences of ratings in kVA and kV as compared with those selected for calculations in this problem. Use the correcting equation from Step 3, above.

For motor A:
X”A = (0.15 p.u.) (25,000 kVA / 15,000 kVA) (13.0 kV / 13.8 kV)2 = 0.222 p.u.

For motor B:
X”B = (0.15 p.u.)(25,000 kVA  /10,000 kVA)(13.0 kV / 13.8 kV)2 = 0.333 p.u.


6. Draw the Reactance Diagram

The completed reactance diagram is shown in Figure 5:

Single line reactance circuit diagram (reactances shown on a per-unit basis)
Figure 5 – Single line reactance circuit diagram (reactances shown on a per-unit basis)

7. Calculate Operating Conditions of the Motors

If the motors are operating at 12 kV, this represents 12 kV/13.8 kV = 0.87 per-unit voltage. At unity power factor, the load is given as three-quarters or 0.75 p.u.

Thus, expressed in per unit, the combined motor current is obtained by using the equation:
Iper unit = per-unit power/per-unit voltage = 0.75/0.87 = 0.862 ∠0° p.u.

8. Calculate the Generator Terminal Voltage

The voltage at the generator terminals is:

  • VG = Vmotor + the voltage drop through transformers and transmission line
  • VG = 0.870° + 0.862 0°(j0.101 + j0.313 + j0.101)
  • VG = 0.87 + j0.444 = 0.977 ∠27.03° p.u.

In order to obtain the actual voltage, multiply the per-unit voltage by the base voltage at the generator. Thus,

  • VG = (0.977 27.03°) (13.8 kV) = 13.48 ∠27.03° kV

Related Calculations

In the solution of these problems, the selection of base voltage and apparent power are arbitrary. However, the base voltage in each section of the circuit must be related in accordance with transformer turns ratios.

The base impedance may be calculated from the equation:
Zbase = (base kV)(1000) / (base kVA).

For the transmission line section in this problem, Zbase = (72.136)(1000) / (25,000) = 208.1
Thus the per-unit reactance of the transmission line equals (actual ohms) / (base ohms) = 65 / 208.1 = 0.313 p.u.


66kv substation control room introduction

Reference // Handbook of el. power calculations by H. Wayne Beaty (Get hardcover from Amazon)

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About Author

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Edvard Csanyi

Edvard - Electrical engineer, programmer and founder of EEP. Highly specialized for design of LV/MV switchgears and LV high power busbar trunking (<6300A) in power substations, commercial buildings and industry fascilities. Professional in AutoCAD programming. Present on

5 Comments


  1. M Sarmad
    Nov 10, 2017

    i need building line electrical network design manual or related calculation, Please help me


  2. Theodore
    Nov 10, 2017

    Hello.
    I am just wondering on step 3 Calculate the Transformer Reactance why did you use 0.11 as the nameplate p.u. reactance?Where do we find this information on the details given for the components of the power system?
    Thank you.


  3. Joshua
    Nov 02, 2017

    Great article. Hoping for some more of these.


  4. Josè Severino Queiroz
    Nov 01, 2017

    Congatulation for your work about single diagram . it’s simple and pratical very good.

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