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31 Common Household Circuit Wirings You Can Use For Your Home (3rd part)
31 Common Household Circuit Wirings You Can Use For Your Home (3rd part) - photo credit: hotukdeals.com

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Household Circuit Wirings

The list of the last eleven household circuit wirings:

  1. Three-way switches & light fixture (fixture at start of cable run)
  2. Three-way switches & light fixture (fixture at end of cable run)
  3. Three-way switches & light fixture with duplex receptacle
  4. Three-way switches & multiple light fixtures (fixtures between switches)
  5. Three-way switches & multiple light fixtures (fixtures at beginning of run)
  6. Four-way switch & light fixture (fixture at start of cable run)
  7. Four-way switch & light fixture (fixture at end of cable run)
  8. Multiple four-way switches controlling a light fixture
  9. Four-way switches & multiple light fixtures
  10. Ceiling fan/light fixture controlled by ganged switches (fan at end of cable run)
  11. Ceiling fan/light fixture controlled by ganged switches (switches at end of cable run)

21. Three-way switches & light fixture (fixture at start of cable run)

Three-way switches & light fixture (fixture at start of cable run)
Three-way switches & light fixture (fixture at start of cable run)

Use this layout variation of circuit wiring 19 where it is more convenient to locate the fixture ahead of the three-way switches in the cable run. Requires two-wire and three-wire cables.

Use this layout variation of circuit wiring 19 where it is more convenient to locate the fixture ahead of the three-way switches in the cable run
Use this layout variation of circuit wiring 19 where it is more convenient to locate the fixture ahead of the three-way switches in the cable run

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22. Three-way switches & light fixture (fixture at end of cable run)

Three-way switches & light fixture (fixture at end of cable run)
Three-way switches & light fixture (fixture at end of cable run)

This variation of the three-way switch layout (circuit wiring 20) is used where it is more practical to locate the fixture at the end of the cable run. Requires two-wire and three-wire cables.

This variation of the three-way switch layout (circuit wiring 20)
This variation of the three-way switch layout (circuit wiring 20)

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23. Three-way switches & light fixture with duplex receptacle

Three-way switches & light fixture with duplex receptacle
Three-way switches & light fixture with duplex receptacle

Use this layout to add a receptacle to a three-way switch configuration (circuit wiring 21). Requires two-wire and parallel runs of two-wire cables.

Use this layout to add a receptacle to a three-way switch configuration (circuit wiring 21)
Use this layout to add a receptacle to a three-way switch configuration (circuit wiring 21)

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24. Three-way switches & multiple light fixtures (fixtures between switches)

Three-way switches & multiple light fixtures (fixtures between switches)
Three-way switches & multiple light fixtures (fixtures between switches)

This is a variation of circuit wiring 20. Use it to place multiple light fixtures between two three-way switches where power comes in at one of the switches. Requires two- and three-wire cable.

This is a variation of circuit wiring 20
This is a variation of circuit wiring 20

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25. Three-way switches & multiple light fixtures (fixtures at beginning of run)

 Three-way switches & multiple light fixtures (fixtures at beginning of run)
Three-way switches & multiple light fixtures (fixtures at beginning of run)

This is a variation of circuit wiring 21. Use it to place multiple light fixtures at the beginning of a run controlled by two three-way switches. Power comes in at the first fixture. Requires two- and three-wire cable.

This is a variation of circuit wiring 21
This is a variation of circuit wiring 21

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26. Four-way switch & light fixture (fixture at start of cable run)

Four-way switch & light fixture (fixture at start of cable run)
Four-way switch & light fixture (fixture at start of cable run)

This layout lets you control a light fixture from three locations. The end switches are three-way, and the middle is four-way. A pair of three-wire cables enter the box of the four-way switch.

The white and red wires from one cable attach to the top pair of screw terminals (line 1), and the white and red wires from the other cable attach to the bottom screw terminals (line 2).

Requires two three-way switches and one four-way switch and two-wire and three-wire cables.

This layout lets you control a light fixture from three locations
This layout lets you control a light fixture from three locations

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27. Four-way switch & light fixture (fixture at end of cable run)

Four-way switch & light fixture (fixture at end of cable run)
Four-way switch & light fixture (fixture at end of cable run)

Use this layout variation of circuit wiring 26 where it is more practical to locate the fixture at the end of the cable run. Requires two three-way switches and one four-way switch and two-wire and three-wire cables.

Use this layout variation of circuit wiring 26 where it is more practical to locate the fixture at the end of the cable run
Use this layout variation of circuit wiring 26 where it is more practical to locate the fixture at the end of the cable run

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28. Multiple four-way switches controlling a light fixture

Multiple four-way switches controlling a light fixture
Multiple four-way switches controlling a light fixture

This alternate variation of the four-way switch layout (circuit wiring 27) is used where three or more switches will control a single fixture. The outer switches are three-way, and the middle are four-way.

Requires two three-way switches and two four-way switches and two-wire and three-wire cables.

This alternate variation of the four-way switch layout (circuit wiring 27) is used where three or more switches will control a single fixture
This alternate variation of the four-way switch layout (circuit wiring 27) is used where three or more switches will control a single fixture

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29. Four-way switches & multiple light fixtures

Four-way switches & multiple light fixtures
Four-way switches & multiple light fixtures

This variation of the four-way switch layout (circuit wiring 26) is used where two or more fixtures will be controlled from multiple locations in a room. Outer switches are three-way, and the middle switch is a four-way.

Requires two three-way switches and one four-way switch and two-wire and three-wire cables.

This variation of the four-way switch layout (circuit wiring 26) is used where two or more fixtures will be controlled from multiple locations in a room
This variation of the four-way switch layout (circuit wiring 26) is used where two or more fixtures will be controlled from multiple locations in a room

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30. Ceiling fan/light fixture controlled by ganged switches (fan at end of cable run)

This layout is for a combination ceiling fan/ light fixture controlled by a speed-control switch and dimmer in a double-gang switch box. Requires two-wire and three-wire cables.

Ceiling fan/light fixture controlled by ganged switches (fan at end of cable run)
Ceiling fan/light fixture controlled by ganged switches (fan at end of cable run)

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31. Ceiling fan/light fixture controlled by ganged switches (switches at end of cable run)

Use this switch loop layout variation when it is more practical to install the ganged speed control and dimmer switches for the ceiling fan at the end of the cable run.

Requires two-wire and parallel runs of two-wire cables.

Ceiling fan/light fixture controlled by ganged switches (switches at end of cable run)
Ceiling fan/light fixture controlled by ganged switches (switches at end of cable run)

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Reference // The Complete Guide to Electrical Wiring (Current with 2014–2017 Electrical Codes) – Black+Decker

About Author //

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Edvard Csanyi

Edvard - Electrical engineer, programmer and founder of EEP. Highly specialized for design of LV high power busbar trunking (<6300A) in power substations, buildings and industry fascilities. Designing of LV/MV switchgears.Professional in AutoCAD programming and web-design.Present on

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